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20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of war, not only are the u.s. soldiers who suffer there and come home and suffer here but, whole populations. afghanistan and iraq who are suffering posttraumatic stress disorder. >> guest: terrible, terrible. i, had for dinner one young iraqi -- my niece is a dine of simmons and she was outraged at what happened and she went to jordan to help the librarians in the museums. brought over two young iraqis to get a ph.d. i had one for dinner. fala, who i'm very fond of. and as in arab culture whenever he comes over he brings me a gift and puts his hand over his heart. and he told me, that his sister lost her husband and every single one of her children. so she's alone. that was just, that was extraordinarily, how can you live and lose everyone that you love. . . written by a soldier about combat and she was struck. she was thinking, i've got to do something about this. and someone in the audience asked her, is your son a soldier? she said there are no children. that just came out of her. scioscia started an extraordinary project. she was a psychiatrist. her has been set at injury ti
should add it wasn't just a u.s. official in congress and american politics. there were those in the right-wing that were saying this is our chance to get rid of this regime. how do we know that they won't hide missiles in caves or something like that? so how did kennedy few khrushchev once he had agreed to pull the missiles out? did he begin to change his view with him? >> guest: i am not sure. i think it took a while. we were talking about verifying before talking. talking became gradually again once the, once the surveillance was shown that the soviets were in fact following through and they were dismantling and they started to realize that yes the soviets in khrushchev in particular was and later on there were actually moments where -- because once we get through -- see the end of the missile crisis is traditionally when the quarantine ends and the nature of that deal is essentially that there are these long-range bombers in cuba, that there are three weeks of negotiations and it's not something we have to get rid of and eventually khrushchev decides okay fine we will get
to build renewed trust in khrushchev, and it was not a u.s. official. in congress and american politics, people were saying it's our chance to get rid of the regime. how do we know they won't hide missiles in cabs or anything like that. how did kennedy view khrushchev after he agreed to pull the missiles out? >> guest: i'm not sure. it took awhile. we talkedded about trusting before verifying. i think trusting game gradually again once the surveillance flights were showing the soviets, were, in fact, following through, dismantling things, they started to realize, yes, the soviets and khrushchev in particular was actually, you know, perhaps we can trust him, and later on and weeks later, there's moments where trust really comes again because the -- once we get through sort of -- the bookend of the missile crisis is the november 20 deal. >> host: right, when the quarantine ends. >> guest: right. there's long range bombers in cuba, there's three weeks of negotiation about are these or are they not something to get rid of? khrushchev says, dpien -- says, fine, we'll get rid of them. it's an
, you know, if he could pull a fast one on us and i should add it wasn't just u.s. officials in congress and american politics there were those on the right wing who were saying this is our chance to get rid of this regime how do we know they want light missiles in caves or something like that? so how did kanaby and view him once he had agreed to pull the missiles out? did he begin to change his view of him? >> guest: i think it took awhile. we were talking about verifying before trust. the trust came gradually again once the surveillance flights were showing the soviets were in fact falling through, they were dismantling of the started to realize yes the soviets were in particular perhaps we can tactfully trusten, and later on in the weeks after there were actually moments where the trust comes again because once we get through? the missile crisis is traditionally the november 20 deal. and that's the nature of the deal is essentially there are long range bombers in cuba there's three ways of negotiation the tortfeasor are these not something we have to get rid of and eventually crush of
wounds of war. not only u.s. soldiers who suffer there and come home and suffer here, but whole populations in afghanistan and iraq who are suffering post-traumatic stress disorder. >> guest: terrible, terrible. i had for dinner one young iraqi -- my niece was outraged at what happened and she went to jordan to help the librarians in the museum. brought over to young iraqis to get a ph.d.. i had one over for dinner and as an air of culture whenever he comes over he brings me a gift. and he puts his hand over his heart. he told me that his sister lost her husband and every single one of her children. she is alone. that was extraordinary. how can you live and lose everyone that you have lost? how can you? is this post-traumatic stress? will you sleep? will you not have nightmares? because we all have memories and we have bad memories and good ones and we can put them away. can you put this memory away? can a soldier put this memory away? no. >> host: in your research marguerite, you write about different organizations and the people who found them like dr. judith broder, the soldi
says is really the head of the entire administrative office of the u.s. courts. sort of runs the entire court system and that's a whole part of his administrative responsibility they don't have. but that's the chief justice does. >> will talk our god and that decision. let's go back to the beginning. born october 1st, read around this time 1924, his father was a paper salesman and his mother was a homemaker, but she was the dominant force in the household, right? tell me a little bit about mrs. wren quist in a little bit about how she got him to change his middle name, which was what not change the course of his life to >> guest: well, she was very superstitious in terms of the middle name. they named him william donald rehnquist born in october 1st 1924. and his mother he believed she was really very, very fascinating women. she spoke five languages in addition to english. don't ask me what goes where. there's a footnote in the book. she was very learned. she was very proud of her education at the university of wisconsin. with his father and mother were wisconsin nurse. they really hav
that rehnquist was and that the chief is is really the head of the entire administrative office of the u.s. courts. he sort of runs the entire court system, and that's a whole part of his administrative responsibility that the other eight justices don't have. but that's what a chief justice does. >> host: and we'll talk a little bit about how he got into that position, but let's go back to the beginning. wisconsin, a suburb of milwaukee, he was born october 1st, right around this time, 1924. his father was a paper salesman, and his mother was a homemaker, but she was the dominant force in the household, right? tell me a little bit about, um, mrs. rehnquist and a little bit about how she got him to change his middle name which was what changed the course of his life. >> guest: well, she was very superstitious in terms of the middle name. they named him william donald rehnquist when he was born on october 1st in 1924. and, um, his mother, though, believed, um, she was really a very, very fascinating woman. she spoke five languages in addition to english. don't ask me what those fife were, th
have a very good life, and that option is really not available in the u.s. anymore, and i think that is really messed up a lot of men. that is really something that men have had a hard time recovering from in this generation. >> host: what you think that is? >> guest: you know, somebody said to me something so obvious that i have not thought of in this town in alabama that the right about. you have these women in get call themselves feminists and really have not been the question, so the don't like the situation where there suddenly -- they don't believe that they should be the head of there household, but they find themselves in this position and basically start at the bottom and work their way up. but if you ask someone who had a life tended to henry was making a lot of money in doing pretty well, to start again at the bottom, that's harder. it's harder than for the women who -- for of even if they don't call themselves feminists and want to be in this position, it's kind of exciting. you're making a paycheck, letting his skills. that's easier than to ask of the guys to start
a kid in eighth grade geography. passing a note to someone. it it is at the u.s. supreme court. tell me why you devoted an entire chapter to the boredom factor. when what do you make of it when you crassty contrast it to the brainy individual. >>>> guest: i thought i needed to explain why he did the other things i think the dore come, i think the title of the chapter, and i did title the chapter "bored at the court." there was no doubt in my mind he wasn't challenged by much of the work. he had been warned about this by bill douglas. he took him under his wing and they were so ideologically opposite and yet bill douglas believed that as a young man coming on the court, he was 7 when he came to the court. douglas even younger when he was mom nominated by fdr. you have to have a lot of other pursuits. ic that if william was bored, i think if he had not been nominate to be the chief, he needed vast stimulus, really, because he was so smart. and so i think that if he had not been nominated to be chief, it's clear to me going back and reading my interview transcript with him he would have re
not available in in the u.s. anymore and i think that is really messed up a lot of men and that is really something that men have had a hard time recovering from. >> host: . [inaudible] >> guest: somebody said something so obvious that i hadn't thought of. and a talent in alabama that i write about you do not call yourself a feminist. they are christians so they don't like the situation where they are suddenly -- they don't believe they should be the head of their household but they find themselves in this position. they basically started the bottom and weight -- worked their way up but if you ask someone if he was making a lot of money and doing pretty well to start again in the bottom, that's harder. it's harder for the women for whom even if they don't call themselves feminists and don't want to be in a position, you are suddenly making a paycheck and learning new schools and learning new things about yourself. that's easier than to ask a guy to start from the bottom again or to say hustle so i got a sense every time that they have been protected in some funny way. i don't -- we don't
in the u.s. anymore and i think that's really messed up a lot of men. that's really something that men have had a hard time recovering from in this generation. >> host: why do you think that is? >> guest: you know, somebody said to me something that is so obvious that i haven't thought of in this town in alabama that i write about. you have these women that do not call themselves feminists. they don't like the situation where they are suddenly -- they don't believe they should be the head of their household but they find themselves in this position and basically look at that and work their way up but if you ask someone that had a life and it to him basically where he was making a lot of money and doing a pretty well to start again at the bottom, that's harder. it's harder than for the women who, for whom even if they don't call themselves feminists and don't want to be in this position it's kind of exciting you are suddenly making a paycheck and learning these things about yourself. that's easier than to ask the guys to start from the bottom again or to sort of be in a way that they were no
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)